Feature

Six Nease Seniors Offer Tips For Combatting Senioritis

Google defines senioritis as “a supposed affliction of students in their final year of high school or college, characterized by a decline in motivation or performance.” We asked five seniors from our staff about how they deal with their senioritis. Their answers are below. Bre Jarvis (Editor-in-Chief): Keep telling yourself that you can overcome this. Don’t. Repeat until you have a mental breakdown, fueled by caffeine the entire process. Matthew Fiedler (Opinion Editor): Don’t skip school! Tell a friend to give you a call and meet up at school. Set goals that involve coming to school. You can’t succeed if you don’t try! Denise Uy (Feature Editor): Your teachers have probably given up too by now, so think about how easy your classes are! Look forward to never coming back to Nease again (as a student) in a few short months. Fara Supre (Co-Publisher): Don’t think that you have all the time in the world to get yourself together; you have 10-ish months…that’s it. Focus on the all the things that you enjoy about school; they will probably outweigh all the negatives. Nevada Suckow (Staff Writer): Start a count down, but for everyday get something productive done. Set goals with friends and hold each other to them. Hannah Favorite (Co-Publisher): Take a deep breath- know it’ll be over soon. Go to the beach before/after school to breath. Make a bullet journal.

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Linked up with Leadership

By Maria Ribot (Managing Layout Editor) We all know that the first day of high school is a very intimidating and scary experience for all students, especially the incoming freshmen. Link Crew’s mission is to help freshmen transition into high school smoothly and also provide them with a mentor, and even a friend, to help them adapt to high school. Link crew leaders are composed of Juniors and Seniors that have gone through the application process for the organization and have really wanted to participate in this program. If accepted into the program, Link Crew leaders attend the Link Crew retreat and orientation training process, which involves getting to know how freshman feel at orientation. They not only help freshmen, but they also help the new to Nease upperclassmen easily transition and adapt to a new school. Link Crew leaders also have the choice to take the Link Crew elective with Ms. Bowker. This is the second year that this course is being held. The Link crew class has also allowed her to start her day with good news and a weekly positivity circle. A positivity circle is composed of all class members and they have to say one positive characteristic to the person to their right. Positivity has everything to do with Link Crew. This statement was further explained by Ms. Bowker; “Putting over that trust [of positivity] into high school students to be that positive force for change has really helped to broaden my horizons as far as positivity is concerned “. She then added that “influencing positivity to anyone I interact with on a daily basis has really made that a priority in my life.” Part of Link Crew’s mission is not only to help freshmen transition to high school, but to be ambassadors of positivity and kindness on-campus and off-campus to other people. Due to the increased number of Link Crew members, the class had to be split into 2 class periods, 1st and 4th. Ms. Bowker was asked how Link Crew has impacted her life, she responded, “The Link Crew class has allowed the club an opportunity to become more active throughout the school year”.  With this comes events that will be available for the whole school to participate in because of the class. With organizing school-wide events, comes rigorous planning and approval. For example, on August 24th, students in both class periods were able to pitch and present ideas to Mrs. Kunze for events taking place in the fall.  This presentation allowed the Link Crew leaders to obtain feedback and suggestions about how they can make their events better and more efficient.  So, stay tuned for updates regarding these events!   Follow us on Instagram, for daily updates!   Make sure you stay tuned to social media updates coming your way as the first issue comes out with a brand-new design.     1st period Link Crew class stands still for a formal photo before they are told that they can be silly again. Cover Photo Credit: bhsguidance.com

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New to Nease: Exchange Students

Cover Photo Credit: Lily McKenna By: Lily McKenna (Social Media Manager) and Halie Childress (Layout Editor)   For the 2018-2019 school year, Nease has a few exchange students from around the world. They have experienced things differently than us Nease-natives; however, they’re also normal kids just like all of us.   We decided to interview one of these students to learn about their experiences when moving to a whole new country. In addition, we have some tips on how to better welcome an exchange student to our school.   Joris Louvier, a French exchange student who is currently attending Nease for his junior year, decided to share some thoughts about his experience with the Rotary exchange program. His family isn’t new to the exchange program, as his older brother spent a year in Texas through it. They come from a French state (or “department”) in the French Alps called Haute-Savoie that borders Italy and Switzerland. Due to the geography of Europe, it’s not uncommon for many countries to border one another, creating an interesting cultural mix. This particular area, though not full of palm trees and ninety-degree weather, has its fair share of unique traits. Since it is in the Alps, temperatures can get down to -15°F; of course, it can reach the 80s in the summer, but the Florida humidity is still suffocating in comparison. In France, the rooms are smaller and the language is only similar in terms of alphabet. Their traditions and values are decidedly much different than ours here in America. A greeting is a standard kiss on both cheeks, and food is a large part of the identity. After Joris expressed an extreme dismay for American cheese and bread, I asked him his reasons for making the very big trip to America. “There are many reasons,” he began, “but travel, meeting new people, and figuring out what I want to do in the future are the biggest ones.” Though the exchange presents an abundance of opportunity, it does have a learning curve. So far, I’ve had to explain what Build-A-Bear is to him. A large room of teddy bear corpses and Frankenstein stuffed animals must sound very strange to an outsider. Recently cast in the fall play, Joris has already integrated himself at his new school. His character, initially written as a British man, was completely re-done as French to fit his accent, and he brings an incredible talent to our school. After pursuing his hobbies in France for many years, he decided to engage in them here as well. Though they don’t grow up here, many exchange students can be easily compared to an average kid who has. Joris told me, “I’m just trying to live like a normal American,” and so far, he is doing a perfectly fine job. He likes memes, finds the fact that his host brother constantly flexes on Snapchat a bit odd, and really hates Minions. Unfortunately, the small yellow demons managed to invade Europe. And, even though the croissants we have here don’t compare to those in France, they aren’t so bad. The host family that has taken Joris in for the year, that of senior Jonah Paxton, has been wonderful in acclimating him to a whole new country. Though he misses his family and friends back home in France, it isn’t always easy to contact them due to time zone differences and schoolwork. “I can’t enjoy what I am doing here if I am always on my phone, talking to [family in France],” Joris says. “But they understand that. It cost a lot of money to make this exchange possible, so I’m gonna try my best to live it as much as I can.” For now, he’s focusing on taking as much of America in as he can for the short year he has here. He knows time will fly, but is extremely grateful to have the opportunity to have this experience at such a young age. After our lunch interview wrapped up and I was on my way to 5th period, my phone lit up. It was Joris. “I forgot…I really miss baguettes.” Joris is just one of the exchange students at Nease and as students of Nease High School. They are new to the country and they probably don’t know anyone, which can be pretty daunting. Here are some tips on how to make an exchange student feel more welcome!      1.  Give them a warm welcome.   If they do not say “Hi” first, then introduce yourself. Break the barrier, and make sure  you smile so you seem welcoming. Ask for their name, and if it is hard to pronounce, ask politely how to say it and try repeating it until you understand. It’s important that they keep their culture with them!    2.  Find out about their interests.   Inquire about things such as their hobbies and what their favorite subjects in school are. Ask questions that you would anyone when trying to get to know them; who knows, maybe you will even find some common interests.    3.  Introduce the exchange student to you friends.   Tell the exchange student your friends’ names interests, etc. This will invite more possible friendships to the exchange student.     4.  Include the them in activities.   You can include them by inviting them to sit with you at lunch, to school games, or to other activities inside and outside of school. Hang out with them and show them around their new home for the year!    5.  Inform them on activities at the school.   Tell them about when games, theatre shows, and other cool events are. Tell them about sports and cool clubs they may be interested in, too. With over 50 clubs at Nease, they are bound to find something that piques their interest.    6.  Give them tips about the school.   Tell them about things only students, teachers, and faculty at Nease would know about. For example, if they are going to the portables, tell them about the “one way only” hall that is quicker to use. Even little tips that may not seem helpful to you could help them out tremendously.    7.  Be open and ready to help if needed.   Make sure that you are there for the exchange student if they need you, and make sure you make it clear that you are available to help them anytime. Remember: you may be a pro at being an American, but this is all new to them! It is so much fun to learn about an exchange student and the country they come from. Remember, an exchange student is a high school student just like you. They may be different or have been born and raised in another country than ours, but that doesn’t mean that you have to treat them any differently than you would your friends that are from America. Meeting kids involved in the exchange program has been a wonderful experience. We can’t wait to see what this school year brings both us and our new Nease students from around the world!   Sources: “Student Tips:Going to High School” and Wikihow “How to Welcome a New Kid”  

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Self-Harm. Substance Abuse. Eating Disorders.

*Trigger warning* The following article covers serious topics that may be disturbing for some readers and could lead to relapse in those struggling with self-harm.

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Vegan or Vegetarian?

By Hannah Favorite (Editor-in-Chief of Happenstance) This post is an extension of Hannah Favorite’s article “Healthy Life, Happy Life”. If you haven’t read it yet, check out our February 2018 issue! Millennials are all about what’s in, and currently veganism and vegetarianism are in. But are these hot trends really good for you? Vegan vs. Vegetarian Vegans do not consume any animal products, including milk, eggs, fish, all meats, honey, and anything that animals may produce. Vegetarians are a little less strict, and have more wiggle room. Vegetarians traditionally do not eat meats, but will still eat fish and other animal products. There are many health benefits to both lifestyles, but also many side effects. Cons Not only is it difficult to shop for a plant based diet, but more expensive as well. Also, plant based eating can be nutritionally insufficient. Many people who pursue these lifestyles have to take vitamins in the form of pills on a regular basis to prevent their bodies from shutting down. Many vegans and vegetarians are also at risk of an insufficiency in vitamin D or vitamin K, which are both necessary for bone health. Protein is another macromolecule that composes body tissues including hair, muscle, and collagens, and it helps the body produce enzymes and antibodies. This important compound can be found in almonds, eggs, oats, cottage cheese, milk, Greek yogurt, and broccoli. Not all of these are consumed by vegans, but vegetarians will eat these particular foods. Pros The raising of cattle and other animals requires massive amounts of land, water, energy, and food. 1% of the world’s greenhouse gases are from agriculture, as well as extensive animal suffering — one of the main reasons many people decide to cut meats out of their diet. Environmentalism and animal cruelty are not the only reasons to change the way you eat. There are many benefits to cutting meat out of your life, such as lowering your blood pressure, reducing the risk of diabetes, and even losing weight. Vegetarians consume less calories and fat on a daily basis. Generally, this produces a loss in weight and lowers the risk of many heart diseases.

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Bullying in Today’s World

By Bella Ibrahim (News Editor) Bullying has been a problem across the United States for a long time.  While rates of physical bullying have gone down across the past seventy years, verbal rates have stayed around the same, and new technology causes a new problem: cyberbullying (ecommons.luc.edu).  Sixteen percent of high school students have experienced cyberbullying in just the past year (americanspcc.org), and this problem is not going away — it is only getting worse. Fifty-two percent of all LGBT students have been cyberbullied before graduating high school. The state of Florida has strict laws against bullying and harassment at school or on school property, including the bus, but there are no state-wide remote bullying laws. In St. Johns County, bullying is considered a level 3 infraction of the student code of conduct, which includes cyberbullying and cyberstalking. Of course, this policy cannot help students that refuse to talk about being bullied or harassed, so the best thing to do is to report anything that happens to you or anyone else. Cyberbullying is not the only type of bullying that students endure despite the school systems’ effort — bullying occurs right under their noses. Emily Kochanowski speaks up by saying, “I have never been bullied, but I witness different forms of bullying in my classes. It simply isn’t right to bully others — especially if they did nothing to hurt you and you just think it’s funny. There is nothing funny about making people feel badly.” It can be hard to believe that people would throw people down just to make themselves feel better or to make themselves laugh, but it does happen. Another student at Nease, Ally Lachina, says, “Bullying is unacceptable under any circumstances.” While most seem to be very against the idea of bullying, thirty percent still admit to bullying others in their lifetime. One student that wishes not to be named is tired of all the hypocrites: “I was bullied as an elementary and middle school student. I was really chubby and awkward as a child and they [the bullies] fed off of that. They would pretend they were my friend only to normalize the belittling and teasing. Then as I got older I matured into someone that I suppose the previous bullies would be alright associating themselves with, but I didn’t want to be with someone that made others feel the way I felt when I was young. They made me so miserable that I didn’t want to come to school at all. I once convinced my mom that I had the flu for a week just to escape them temporarily, but when I came back things started up again. It took me a while to figure out that I wasn’t bullied because there was something wrong with me; I was bullied because there was something wrong with them.”  This student understands that it isn’t the person being bullied’s fault for what’s happening to them, helping them not to become one of the two-thirds of people bullied that bully other people. Every single school day across the United States 160,000 students stay home for fear of being bullied. While physical bullying is less of a problem then it has been historically, it still is a problem. There have been a few fights at Nease and of course other high schools across the state and the country this year. Sometimes small fights between friends escalate into something that isn’t easily controlled and both of them get in trouble. There are ways to prevent harassment and bullying; In schools with an anti-bullying program there are fifty percent less bullying incidents reported. A way for other students to help prevent this is to notice the indications in someone if they refuse to tell anyone. Indicators that someone you care about could be being bullied include: A sudden change in their school attendance, having an apparent difficulty to concentrate on anything, having a low self-esteem, being passive, withdrawn, or overly sensitive, displaying signs of anxiety and/or depression, feeling they do not seem to fit in, and talking about running away or committing suicide (standforthesilent.org). All of these are signs that they may be being bullied and one way to help them is to try to talk things out with this person and make sure they feel comfortable with telling you if something is happening. If you are being bullied, some tips for coping are to: Try to understand the bully, confront the bully (if you feel safe enough), never suffer through it in silence, know that it is a criminal offense, do not see yourself as the problem, deal with the stress in a healthy way like exercising, do not isolate yourself as hard as it may seem, look after your health mentally and physically, seek role models, and always, always, always tell someone that can put it to an end. One thing someone can do if they are experiencing bullying is to tell a teacher, administrator, or guidance counselor you are comfortable with what is happening and take their advice as to what to do next.

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Halloween Fun

By: Bella (News Editor) and Maria (Opinion Editor) Halloween is coming up and we are going to help you plan the best party on the block! Pre-Party Fun: Corn Maze Harvest Fields Corn maze 2300 FL-40, Ormond Beach, FL 32174 Pumpkin Patch Mandarin United Methodist Church 11270 San Jose Blvd, Jacksonville, FL 32223 Party Decorations & Set Up: Glow-in-the-Dark Party (karaspartyideas.com) For a glow-in-the-dark spectacular, replace your light-bulbs with the very low budget black lights. With this minor change of lights, your guests will glow in the dark, making your party very spooky and entertaining for all ages. DIY Photo Booth (celebrations.com) This inexpensive custom idea will leave your guests wanting more. This party idea is entertaining for all ages. Your guests can take all the crazy pictures they want with this DIY idea. Ghostly Balloons (balloonparty.ie) This simple party trick will have your guests mesmerized. All it takes is one balloon and a piece of mesh cloth, or some type of fabric. You blow up the balloon, tape a string to it so you can hang it anywhere and drape the piece of fabric over it. The black lights will help it glow, creating the effect of a ghost floating in midair. TRICK OR TREAT: Pumpkin Mousse Parfaits (foodnetwork.com) This recipe is super simple and fun to make. Your guests will love its fall vibe and the fact that it can be a quick snack during your party. For this recipe, you can simply buy the ingredients pre-made and assemble them or make the ingredients from scratch. Take vanilla pudding and add in pumpkin spice powder, cinnamon, nutmeg, and ground cloves. Mix until well combined. Take the whipped topping and pour it into a medium-sized mixing bowl. Crumble up vanilla sandwich cookies and add them to the whipped topping. Mix until well combined. Line up mason jars to start assembling the parfait Layer ingredients starting with the vanilla sandwich cookie crumbs. Add about ½ cup of the pumpkin pudding you made first. Finally, add the whipped topping mixture to the top. Repeat steps 6-8 until all the mason jars are filled up. Optional: Use remaining cookie crumbs as garnish on the top of parfait. You can find the original recipe here. Food Network’s version of the recipe calls for dark rum, but we’ve modified the ingredient list for underage readers :).  

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Beyond Nease: Seniors After High School by Vikki Damon

After their graduation ceremony in May, the graduating class of 2017 will officially be making their way out of the halls of Nease High School and forging their own new paths in the world. Many seniors at Nease have shared their aspirations for themselves after they graduate: whether it is through college, trade school, professional sports, the fine arts, the military, etc. Several seniors are taking their academic skills to universities later this year. Senior Alexis Gilliard, actively involved in Nease’s theatre program, has been accepted into Molloy College, where she will take part in the BFA Theatre Arts Program. She says, “My plan is to attend there in the fall and, like for most, Broadway is the dream, but to be involved with theatre in any way. To bring joy to others by sharing stories would make my life worthwhile.” Another senior, Felipe Quiñones, is currently a player on the Nease tennis team. Although he will not be continuing with athletics, he says, “I plan on going into a pre-med track in college and majoring in Portuguese. I hope to also study abroad for a year in Europe.” Jackie Cicalese is attending the University of Florida in the fall, where she will most likely play for their club tennis team; Jemma Tassopoulos was accepted into the University of North Florida; and Caroline Jones is thrilled to be attending Vanderbilt University in September. Other seniors have decided to choose other available paths. Hunter Jones is joining the United States military in September of this year. He says, “I plan on joining the Navy and becoming a Nuclear Reactor Operator on a submarine off of the West Coast.” Kathleen Reyes, “I will be taking a gap year to work on [her] art while taking some classes in Tampa or Miami.” One other senior girl, who asked to remain anonymous, said she wishes to travel as much as possible, around the country and around the world. She says, “I just want to go on a different adventure every day.” Senior class president Grant Burmeister hopes to become a traveling salesman. He explains, “You can make big money without a college education.” The Nease High School staff and students wish our graduating seniors the best of luck on their journeys through life.

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The Sea-sun for a Staycation by Natalja Gontrum

Residing in sunny Florida allows for a plethora of near-by vacation attractions. The options are seemingly limitless for those who love to travel or just visit discover beautiful places. While everyone knows that Florida is the home of Disney, Universal and a multitude of beaches, there are more options for someone seeking a bit of adventure. Following are some recommended “stay-cation” sweet spots, all four hours or closer and relatively affordable. *the distance to each location is from Allen D. Nease High School Amelia Island- 1 hour trip -13 miles of beaches -Rated one of Florida’s top 10 beaches -Historic location due to being the south’s deepest natural harbor -Whale sitting in the winter for rare Atlantic whales -Fort Clinch is rated #1 by Trip Advisor in the area, holding civil war re-enactments the first weekend of every month, fort tours, a pier and hiking areas. Savannah, Georgia- 2 hours, 20 minute trip -River Street, along the Savannah River, features shopping and eateries of all sorts -City market is the downtown portion of Savannah which has nightly band performances -Famous for its hanging Spanish Moss canopies -Has numerous city squares and parks -Savannah also offers ghost tours -Very artsy city, home of SCAD and many art venues and shows, such as the Tiffani Taylor Gallery -Is home to historical Revolutionary and Civil war monuments -Fun fact: This is where Forest Gump was filmed. Springs- Ginnie Springs in Gainsville Devils Den- 2 hours 2 minutes -Offers sccuba tours of the spring Blue Springs -Manatees are known to stay here during the winter months -Tubing and swimming are offered here. Crystal River Manatees- 2 hours, 40 minute trip -In Kings Bay -The only place where “passive observation” is allowed by Federal Government -Snorkeling and diving options available -Crystal River remains approximately 72 degrees all year long, so manatees refugee there from cold gulf waters seasonally. State Parks- Cumberland Island Florida Caverns State Park- 3 hours, 48 minutes -only state park in Florida to offer public cavern tours -The Chipola River and Blue Hole spring provide an area for boating or fishing -Park was created under the New Deal to create jobs Falling Waters State Park- 4 hours -Boasts Florida’s highest waterfall -The drop is 73 feet Washington Oaks Gardens State Park- 45 minutes -Offers beaches and several nature trails

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Prom on a Budget by Maggie McElhaney, Taylor Leksander, and Julia Jordan

All girls look for the perfect prom dress, but often at an un-perfect price. However, the perfect dress is still out there and at a much more affordable price! Check out these prom dress “dupes” to make your heart and your wallet smile! 1. Red and Bling Price: $397.99 at Star 33 vs. Price: $199 at Prom Girl 2. Sleek and Dark Price: $377.99 at Star 33 vs. Price: $189 at Prom Girl 3. Elegant Two-Pieces                           Price: $298 at Prom Girl vs. Price: $198 at Prom Girl

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