News

Farewell, Coach Krause

The Nease football coach, Tim Krause, is resigning as of next season, to be a head coach at Bishop Kenny High School.   After coaching for 8 years at Bishop Kenny before Nease, his ties with Bishop Kenny run deep. Having the experience of head coaching at Nease for 5 years helped him to be chosen for the position of Head Coach, according to Thorsen, the former football coach of Bishop Kenny football team and now athletic director.   As of Victory Day, Mr. McCool will ensure that this tradition endures, so the community can still enjoy and take advantage of the experience that comes with this special day. All the work done by Krause and the athletic department will not go to waste, according to McCool.   For more information click here.

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December 2018 Issue

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SOUPer Bowl Photos

Photo Credit: Hannah Favorite

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SOUPer Bowl: Great Event—Even Greater Cause

The 2019 SOUPer Bowl took place January 31 at Nease High School and raised approximately $30,000 from ticket sales and donations. Money raised at the event will be donated to Blessings in a Backpack, an organization that fills backpacks with food for children in need to take home on weekends. Tickets were sold for $25 dollars each and donations were taken as well. Each attendee was able to bring home a bowl made by a St. Johns County student and was able to try 26 soups provided by various restaurants in the community. At the end of the event, each attendee was able to vote on which soup was their favorite; St. Johns Technical High School of the Culinary Arts won the title of “People’s Choice Award” for their tortilla soup, a Mexican–themed soup topped with fresh avocado bits. In a speech at the end of the event, Valley Ridge was congratulated for raising the most money out of the 11 schools for the SOUPer Bowl’s side project, “Be The Change.” Kate Blumberg, head chair of the event, said “We ask any of the schools that would like to collect change for a particular week, usually in January, and then that tallies up and they can compete for a trophy.” In total, the 11 schools raised over $3,000 that will be used to provide food for children in St. Johns County that may not have food enough in their pantry for the weekend. Two Nease IB Juniors, Sanya Bansal and Shai Kothari, spearheaded both projects. Sanya Bansal said “We helped organize campaigns at local schools in St. Johns County that collected change for a week…All this change will go towards Blessings in a Backpack.” For more information on what goes on behind the scenes of the SOUPer Bowl, check out Issue 3 of The Vertical. By Hannah Favorite (Co-Publisher) Cover Photo Credit: Hannah Favorite  

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Common Core is No More

Florida Governor Ron DeSantis issued an Executive Order Friday afternoon finally disbanding Common Core learning styles in Florida schools. Many are on edge about the potential impact regarding this sudden change. For more information click here.

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Nease Votes are in—and the Results are Not the Same as the Rest of FL

By Alexander Brailsford Although many students do not yet have the ability to legally vote, The Vertical’s mock election granted them the power to voice their preferences in this year’s midterm elections. Some pundits have labeled this year’s elections as the most important of our lifetimes, with many issues potentially arriving at the forefront of the political agenda as Democrats battle the Trump administration. All eyes have been on Florida this year. Millions of dollars were given to campaigns from both in-state and out-of-state contributors. The current governor, Republican Rick Scott, faces term limits and has instead pursued the seat of Democrat Bill Nelson, who was up for reelection. To fill Governor Scott’s seat, Representative Ron DeSantis (who represented some Nease students prior to redistricting in 2017) veyed for the post with Tallahassee mayor Andrew Gillum, who aimed to become the state’s first African-American governor. An illustration of the polarization of today’s political field, DeSantis represents the fiery fervor of President Trump and his followers, whereas Gillum–endorsed by Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and former President Barack Obama–possesses values of near-socialism and the farther left. Many political scientists have labeled Florida as a “report card” from the American people for President Trump’s first two years. 115 Nease students cast votes in The Vertical’s mock election, posted online at our website. The results are fairly surprising considering that more than half of St. Johns County’s registered voters are Republicans. Nease voters selected three Democrats for the governor’s, senator’s, and representative’s seats, whereas, in reality, Floridians elected all three opposing Republicans. This disparity may result from largely only liberals voting in this mock election (thus provoking an interesting point about the power of political apathy). As of two days after Election Day, both the senatorial and gubernatorial races technically remain up in the air. The margin of victory is so miniscule that a recount may be demanded, and the results may change. An additional important note to add is that Florida encountered record turnout in most counties for a midterm election as the state faces important issues like Cuban and Mexican migration, refugee resettlement, gun control arising from the Parkland massacre, and the toxic red algae blooms.   POSITION/ AMENDMENT NEASE RESULTS CURRENT ELECTION RESULTS FROM THE STATE OF FLORIDA (The New York Times) Governor Andrew Gillum (D) – 67% Ron DeSantis (R) – 32% Darcy Richardson (Reform) – 1% Ron DeSantis (R) – 49.6% Andrew Gillum (D) – 49.2% Darcy Richardson (Reform) – 0.6% Senator Bill Nelson (D) – 60% Rick Scott (R) – 40% Rick Scott (R) – 50.1% Bill Nelson (D) – 49.9% Representative (4th District) Ges Selmont (D) – 51% John Rutherford (R) – 35% Joceline Berrios (I) – 9% Jason Bulger (I) – 5% John Rutherford (R) – 65.2% Ges Selmont (D) – 32.3% Joceline Berrios (I) – 1.9% Jason Bulger (I) – 0.6% Amendment 4 (Voting Restoration) YES – 81% NO – 18% YES – 64.5% NO – 35.5% Amendment 7 (First Responder/ Military Benefits; Public Colleges and Universities) YES – 87% NO – 13% YES – 65.8% NO – 34.2% Amendment 9 (Prohibits Offshore Oil and Gas Drilling; Prohibits Vaping in Enclosed Indoor Workplaces) YES – 78% NO – 22% YES – 68.9% NO – 31.1% Florida statistics from https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/11/06/us/elections/results-florida-elections.html Cover Photo Credit: RT.com

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Are my SAT/ACT Scores College-Ready?

Middle 50% Accepted SAT/ACT: Fall 2018 University of Florida Sat: 1300-1450 Act (remember- this is not superscored!): 29-33   University of North Florida Sat: EWR- 610-680; M: 590-670 Act: Composite- 25-29; E/W- 24-30   Florida State University Sat: 1290-1400 Act: 28-32   University of Central Florida Sat: 1280-1370 Act (remember- this is not superscored!): 26-30   University of West Florida Sat: 1130-1230 Act: 23-27   Florida A&M University  Sat: ERW- 550-590, M- 550-590 Act: 18-21   Florida Atlantic University Sat: ERW- 560-640, M- 570-640 Act: English- 20-25, Math- 20-25, Reading- 21-26, Science- 23-27    Florida Gulf Coast University Sat: ERW- 550-620, M-530-600 Act: 24-25   Florida International University Sat: 1280 Act: 28   Florida Polytechnic University Sat: 1230-1350 Act: 27-32   New College of Florida Sat: 1210-1400 Act: 26-32 Cover Photo Credit: Time Magazine  

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Hurricane Michael Approaches NE Florida

Cover photo credit: New York Times By Maria Ribot (Managing Layout Editor) and Bre Jarvis (Co-Editor-in-Chief) Hurricane Michael is currently heading towards Florida’s panhandle and is expected to hit the northeast region of Florida by Wednesday afternoon and die off during Thursday morning. Winds should reach St. Johns county by tomorrow evening, October 9, at around 8:00. Hurricane and storm surge watches have been issued throughout the gulf coast of Florida, with a major focus on the panhandle. Many schools and universities, including Florida State University, have already been canceled for the remainder of the week. As of now, the St. Johns County School District has not released a statement on whether our schools will close during the hurricane. Concerning the hurricane, Governor Rick Scott said: “If any Florida family doesn’t have an emergency preparedness plan, now is the time to act.” He recommends that families gather three days’ worth of food, water, and medicine in preparation for Michael. Floridians should begin preparing for the storm now, before grocery store shelves are cleared of supplies. Do not delay―your family should procure water and nonperishable food items, as well as flashlights and an emergency radio if you don’t already have them. Michael will be a Category 3 hurricane by the time it reaches the Nease area, so be ready to possibly lose electricity and water for several days. A list of Florida counties currently in a state of emergency can be found here. Make sure to check out our Instagram account, @nhsvertical, for more updates. Sources: National Weather Service: https://alerts.weather.gov/cap/wwacapget.php?x=FL125AC1D29884.HurricaneLocalStatement.125AC1DF6C1CFL.JAXHLSJAX.d79e226330c5f5a1c520163ad49fb939 The Weather Channel: https://weather.com/storms/hurricane/news/2018-10-08-hurricane-michael-forecast-gulf-coast-florida Washington Post: https://www.washingtonpost.com/weather/2018/10/08/michael-strengthens-hurricane-is-forecast-make-landfall-florida-dangerous-category-midweek/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.17299ff54322 AccuWeather: https://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/state-of-emergency-declared-schools-close-in-florida-as-storm-preparations-begin-for-hurricane-michael/70006275

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The Gen Z of Politics

Cover Photo Credit: www.orlandosentinel.com By Denise Uy On August 28th, a handful of Nease students were able to take their first few steps in American politics—as those who were eligible to vote were able to directly participate in American democracy for the first time in this year’s primary season. This year, Florida’s political atmosphere is in full-swing as the state prepares to elect a new governor in November, with former Governor Rick Scott (R) becoming ineligible to serve another term. Along with the gubernatorial election, Florida prepares to routinely elect representatives for its twenty-seven congressional districts and one available Senate seat for the federal government’s midterm elections. Though previously serving as governor, candidate Rick Scott was able to cinch his spot as the Republican nominee for the open Florida Senate seat—doing so with over 88% of the votes. In November, he will face off against incumbent Bill Nelson (D), who ran unopposed within the Florida Democratic Party, having served in the Senate since 2001. The 2018 Florida gubernatorial race made history this year as the former Mayor of Tallahassee, Andrew Gillum (D), became the first African-American nominee for Florida governor. Gillum won the Democratic party’s nomination as he secured a little over 34% of the votes, facing off in a close race with fellow nominee Gwen Graham—losing her party’s nomination with only 31% of Democratic votes. Due to Florida state law, a Florida governor may only serve for two consecutive four-year terms. Thus, while Rick Scott makes his campaign for the Senate, the former representative of Florida’s 6th congressional district, Ron DeSantis (R), won his party’s nomination with over half of the votes. Most Nease students live within Florida’s 4th congressional district, which constitutes most of Duval, Nassau, and St. Johns County. In the 2016 congressional election, John Rutherford won this district with 42.6% of the votes and runs again unopposed for the Republican Party as the incumbent—pitting himself up against political newcomer Ges Selmont (D) in November. Though many Nease students are ineligible to vote due to their age, a few have been able to make waves in politics through activism or some other indirect form of political participation. Nease IB senior Ajay Sarma, who currently serves as the chairman of Florida High School Democrats, looks forward to voting in the next presidential election: “I’m excited to vote in the future because as a citizen, your vote is how you let the government know how you feel it should behave as an institution.” When asked why political participation matters to him, especially as a teenager, he replies that “it is important to me as a young person, because this is ultimately the country I’m going to inherit in a few years.” Though Ajay finds himself in the same position as many seniors, months shy of being able to vote in their first election, he looks forward to involving himself politically through other ways in the meantime. Sources: https://www.washingtonpost.com/election-results/florida/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.032503985990#smart-office-topper-househttps://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/08/28/us/elections/florida-primary-elections.htmlhttps://www.washingtonpost.com/election-results/florida/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.032503985990#smart-office-topper-househttps://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/08/28/us/elections/florida-primary-elections.html

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October 2018: Responsibility

Cover Photo Credit: Paul Gorbould Calendar by: Fara Supre

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